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Robin Williams rest in peace!

kelly

Administrator
Staff member
#1
I was saddened to hear of the passing of Robin Williams, one of the greatest comedians of all time. I think many people knew that he suffered from bipolar disorder throughout his adult life. He was apparently in a deep depression when it happened and committed suicide, the worst and often most selfish way to die. Robin Williams was absolutely a comic genius and made me laugh out loud so many times I couldn't possibly count them all, and he will be missed by millions of people, of course in addition to his children, his wife, his siblings and his extended family and many friends.

If there's one thing I've learned from this, it's that none of us are invulnerable to the devastating consequences of depression. Thank God that most of us, in fact almost everyone, find ways to cope and climb out of that pit of despair. The dark tunnel that always has light at the end of it, even if you can't see it right now. We should all think about our family, our friends, loved ones. Everyone has someone who loves them. Everyone! Think about the pain and grief you would give them by killing yourself. And please don't do it!

I've only written about this a handful of times, but the real reason I started this website was to prevent suicide. Treating depression is just a bi-product of that in some respects, and knowing just a little bit about St. John's Wort and other over-the-counter remedies for depression was just my little way of trying to help with the cause.

Kelly
 

kelly

Administrator
Staff member
#2
I just realized that there's something else I learned about Robin Williams while reading some of the reports of his death. While there were many other comedians who considered him a friend, it sounds like Robin never went deeper in his emotions with them than just joking around, which was his specialty. We all need people to confide in and I guess I just assumed Robin's deep emotions, both good and bad, were shared with his family and friends too as a support network for him. But maybe I'm wrong about that. It's possible he kept the dark stuff inside. Anyone have other theories? I will read more about Robin Williams over time.

For myself I can think back to friendships I had where the basis of our friendship was joking around, laughter and fun things. Only when I felt I had built a strong relationship did I ever have serious discussions with some of these friends about my depression that I was experiencing at the time. And in several cases it quickly pushed those people away, and our friendship quickly vanished. I wonder if this was one of the challenges facing Robin Williams, that unwillingness by many people to talk about depression, to hear about a friend's difficulties, sad feelings and tales. I *know* for a fact that there are caring, loving people out there in this world that won't run away when you tell them you're depressed, or seriously depressed, or even suicidal. Find those people who are real gems can make all the difference in the world. I'm sure happy and proud and very much in love with those gems in my life!

kelly
 

kelly

Administrator
Staff member
#3
I just read an article about Robin Williams and the autopsy that was performed after he died. It turns out he had a degenerative brain disease known as Lewy body disease (LBD) that had no cure. His wife wrote an essay about his last few months that was published in a journal of neurology:

http://www.neurology.org/content/87/13/1308.full

For the past couple of years I couldn't look at any shows or movies with Robin Williams in it, I just couldn't bear to think about what he did in the end. But reading his wife's essay was a real eye-opener and proof that he was suffering from a dementia-related disease that caused extreme paranoid, anxiety, hallucinations and other problems and had no cure. At least now I can watch his shows and comedy again without feeling like he took the easy way out.